Lead in Drinking Water

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Recent events in Flint, Michigan, have people across the country asking questions about lead in drinking water. Could it happen here? It is very unlikely, for several reasons:

   Water quality test in DSRSD lab
 

Senior Environmental Chemist Connie Sanchez tests water samples on an instrument that can detect contaminants to the level of a few parts per trillion. DSRSD's lab uses this instrument to test tap water samples for lead and copper.

  • Flint has thousands of lead water pipes and old plumbing fixtures. DSRSD has never used lead pipes in its distribution system.

  • Flint changed its water source, which altered the water’s pH balance. As a result, their water became extremely corrosive and the city did not implement a corrosion-control program. Here, Zone 7 Water Agency adjusts the pH of our water to make it as non-corrosive as possible. Approved by the state’s Division of Drinking Water, Zone 7‘s corrosion-control program has been working effectively for decades, and there has been no significant change in our water supply since corrosion control began.
     
  • DSRSD and Zone 7 regularly test the water in accordance with all state and federal requirements to ensure it is safe to drink.
  • Lead in Drinking Water Q&A

    • Will a water filter protect my family from lead exposure?

    • How does lead get into tap water?

    • Why is lead harmful?

    • How is our water tested for lead?

    • Should I have my water tested for lead?

    • Will DSRSD test my home's water for lead?

    • How can I reduce my exposure to lead in drinking water?

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